2014 Sessions By Day

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Before registering make sure to choose one session per time period. 

Learn about our many session speakers by clicking here.

 

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

10:00 am – 11:00 am Breakout Sessions

#1 School Suicide Postvention and Response – Franciscan

Learn best practice guidelines in crisis planning for schools or districts and the role of administration, staff/faculty, crisis teams, community mental health resources, and parents. Explore the National Association of School Psychologists’ PREPaRE crisis curriculum model which provides training for school personnel in crisis prevention, preparation, intervention and recovery procedures and defines roles and responsibilities for crisis team members. Discover ways to incorporate community resources to maximize mental health resources, strengthen the safety net, and streamline on-site referrals and follow-ups in postvention services.

Amanda Askin, School Mental Health Advocate, NM Department Of Health, Office of School & Adolescent Health; Twila Becenti-Fundark, School Social Worker, Mesa Alta Middle School

#2 Taking the Scary Out of Vision and Hearing Screening – Alvarado F

Do you know what to look for during screenings? Need direction on when to refer and follow-up? Gain useful vision and hearing screening tips to help improve the accuracy of your results.

Laura Case, Director of Nursing, Albuquerque Public Schools; Cheri Dotson, Lead Nurse, Santa Fe Public Schools

#3 Stand-Up for Kindness – Alvarado H

I pledge to speak in a kind way
And to help others throughout my day.
I will not harm others with words or deed
And I will stand up when there’s a need.

This is the Kindness Pledge, and the core concept of a community-wide bullying
prevention initiative. Student members of Santa Fe’s Student Wellness Action Team
(SWAT) Program demonstrate their peer education lesson – Stand Up For Kindness:
Bystander to Upstander. Explore the dynamics of bullying in a school setting (e.g. how
does it feel to be bullied? why do people bully?) and discover what it takes to become an
Upstander. Participate in a discussion about the power of kindness, solutions for dealing
with bullies, and how to move youth from Bystanders to Upstanders.

Debra Bryant, Bullying Prevention Specialist  and Phil Lucero, SWAT Program Coordinator, Santa Fe Public Schools

#4 They’re Driving (B)us Crazy – Fireplace

As we strive for consistency throughout the school setting, a crucial step is often missed – the role of the school bus driver. While schools may promote positive behavioral approaches to dealing with students, drivers are typically left on their
own. Drivers are one more set of eyes and ears keeping students safe; they may also be the first adult a student speaks to in the morning and their attitude and actions can shape the entire day. Moriarty Edgewood School District staff and their transportation
supervisor are bridging the gap between bus rides and school days. Drivers are taught positive methods of interacting with students, de-escalation techniques, how to deal with bullying and appropriate ways to set limits. This resulted in a 38% decrease in
discipline referrals in a year. Through examples and innovative methodology, learn how to develop positive relationships between drivers, students and school staff.

Lisa Kasman-Schlosser, Behavior Integration Specialist, Sandy Orne-Adams, School Counselor, Route 66 Elementary, and Craig Sadberry, Former Transportation Supervisor, Moriarty Edgewood School District (MESD)

#5 Youth Leadership in Community Coalitions – Potters

Community coalitions provide wonderful opportunities for youth leadership development, fostering community engagement and community/school collaboration. How can we encourage youth to actively participate, and how can we help adult members of the coalition to accept and treat youth as equal partners? High school student representatives from the Northern Rio Arriba Communities Health Coalition (NRACHC) share their process, strategies and experiences, and demonstrate their leadership abilities as they discuss the program, strategies to involve and sustain youth memberships, and cultural implications.

Facilitators: Maxinne Daggett, Preventionist and Patricia Serna, Executive Director, North Central Community Based Services. Panelists: Damonica Alderette, Facilitator; Russell Casados, Healthy Eating/ Active Living committee member; Christopher Dominquez, Legislative committee member; Tomas Ortegon, Legislative committee member; Jennifer Lynn Perez, Member; Jeanette Varela, Chair, Parents Who Host Subcommittee, North Central Community Based Services

#6 Start Talking About Healthy Relationships – Alvarado G

Each year, nearly 1.5 million high school students nationwide experience physical abuse from a dating partner. The repercussions can be severe, including increased rates of drug abuse, eating disorders, high-risk sexual behaviors and even suicide. It’s time to Start Talking! Start Talking is a new web based, interactive curriculum designed to encourage students to begin conversations and take an active role in creating positive changes in their relationships, schools and communities. Engage with key components of this curriculum, which meets National Health Education Standards and is part of a four-state initiative developed by Loveisrespect, a partnership between the National Domestic Violence Hotline and Break the Cycle.

Jasmine Ceja, National Youth Organizing Manager, Loveisrespect, Break the Cycle

#7 Children Have Rights, Too! – Weavers

There are times when young people need legal assistance to overcome barriers to their healthy growth and development.  School health personnel must to be able to identify these situations in order to help children find the resources they need. We’ll explore the legal rights of children and youth in a variety of areas: access to health and mental health services, education and public benefits, as well as their right to keep their personal information confidential.  Learn about the rights of children and youth in custody disputes, the consequences of running away, and how youth living independently can become emancipated.  Engage in analyzing various scenarios where the well-being of children and youth is challenged due to legal obstacles, and receive information about ways in which you can assist them.

Elizabeth McGrath, Executive Director/Attorney, and Grace Spulak, Staff Attorney, Pegasus Legal Services for Children

#8 Intuition as a Safety Resource – Turquoise
Previously session #23. 

Physical and sexual assaults are perpetrated most often through manipulation and coercion rather than physical force alone, and our intuition often sends signals when someone is trying to manipulate us. Those of us who help others in the community may experience vicarious trauma, which can make it difficult to tune in to our intuitive sense instead of bias or paranoia. We’ll use interactive exercises, storytelling and humor to lighten up this serious topic. Learn how socialization and media affect how we react in threatening or dangerous situations; assess threat and/or safety; explore barriers to listening to or responding to intuition – our own and others’, and learn how to reduce fear and stay safe. You’ll gain strategies and concepts you can share with others, and use in advocating for students.

Alena Schaim, IMPACT Personal Safety


11:15 am – 12:15 pm Breakout Sessions

#9 Teens and Sex Slavery – Fireplace

Trafficking is a crime of exploitation. Domestic Minor Sex Trafficking is the commercial sexual exploitation of American children within U.S. borders. It is estimated that at least 100,000 American juveniles are victimized through prostitution in America each year. One manifestation of DMST involves a trafficker/pimp who poses as a “boyfriend” who builds a romantic relationship with the youth. This workshop provides information on the DMST victim profile, the relationship between the victim and the trafficker/pimp, including the calculated and methodical stages of how the trafficker establishes trust, and psychologically and physically bonds with the victim.

Kari Meredith, Teen Dating Violence Project Coordinator, NM Attorney General’s Office

#10 E-Cigarettes, Hookah, Little Cigars, Oh My! How to Address Emerging Tobacco Products – Turquoise

Do your students know more about new tobacco products than you? What do you know about e-cigarettes, hookahs and little cigars? Electronic cigarette use by youth has risen dramatically in the past two years alone. School administrators, health professionals and teachers are confronted by an ever-changing array of tobacco products used by, and brought to school by students. Receive information about current data on the new and emerging tobacco products youth are using most often, and their effects on health, behavior and education. Improve your ability to talk with students about the risks of usage, and learn how to use tools from the NM Tobacco-Free Schools Toolkit.

Janine Corinne, Coordinator, NM Tobacco-Free Schools Project;  Shelley Mann-Lev, Director, NM Tobacco-Free Schools Project, Santa Fe Public Schools

#11 Gun Access and Suicide Prevention – Alvarado H

Learn strategies to suicide proof your communities through reducing lethal access, the power of peer education, and positive adult partnerships. Participants will engage in an interactive workshop where they will hear directly from youth, learn tools to positively support young people during difficult times, the signs of suicide and how you can take action in your communities.  GASP (Gun Access & Suicide Prevention) is a youth led suicide prevention campaign, with a specific focus on the intersections of gun safety, gun access, and suicide prevention.

Rosie Garibaldi, Racial Justice Coordinator, NM Forum for Youth in Community, NM Youth Alliance; Leslie Alvarado, Kateri Daw, German Gonzalez and Kaylee Pesina, Peer Educators, Gun Access & Suicide Prevention

#12 Transforming Schools through an Upstander Culture – Potters

Schools should be a place for educational development and emotional growth, not a place where the perpetration or acceptance of sexual violence is the social norm.  The field of violence prevention is evolving, new strategies are being implemented, and youth need to be engaged in creating change – now, more than ever. We’ll share Upstander Intervention strategies that can transform a school climate, enabling  students to support each other, succeed and thrive.

Bianca Villani, Prevention Education Coordinator, Rape Crisis Center of Central New Mexico

#13 The Faces of Bullying – Franciscan

A bully used to just be a mean kid taking someone’s lunch money. Today they show up in classes, online encounters and on social networking sites, and this behavior has become more the norm than an occasional occurrence. The documentary film “Bully” reports that more than 13 million American kids will be bullied this year, and 3 million students are absent each month because they feel unsafe at school. Statistics tell one side of the story; personal narratives tell another. This presentation puts a “face” to these stories, and is designed to foster conversation among education, health and mental health professionals. We’ll talk about the prevalence and types of bullying, discuss consequences, and address effective strategies for dealing with these behaviors.

Patricia Dobson, PhD, Dept. Chair/Asst. Professor, Eastern New Mexico University; Wayne Keith Head, Social Worker, School Counselor, Clovis Municipal Schools

#14 SHAC Showcase:  Motivating Students Toward Health – Alvarado F

Learning and adopting healthy behaviors can insure a student’s well-being, provide skills and strength that can last a lifetime, and support a wholesome school environment. However, adolescents are susceptible to high-risk behaviors, and these are prevalent in New Mexico.  A local School Health Advisory Council (SHAC) is a valuable strategy for strategically engaging them in creative, experiential ways. Wilson Middle School students and community school staff will introduce you to the highly effective initiatives of Wilson’s multicultural SHAC, including their successful SHAC-a-thon, focused on physical activities and health education. Catchy youth-created graphics and language, as part of the Youth Health Literacy Project, put health care messaging in a whole new light.

Janyce Cardenas and Benigno Vasquez, Community Engagement Coordinators, Youth Development Inc., Elev8 NM

#15 The Lowdown on Getting High: Educating Parents About Substance Abuse – Weavers

Parents need to know more about what their children aren’t telling them. New Mexico has one of the highest rates for drug and alcohol use among teens, and parents are often unaware of current trends in substance abuse in their community.  Join us to find out how and why Parent Education Nights can be a valuable resource. We will focus on drug and alcohol issues our kids face based on data from school health offices, school resource officers, the NM Children, Youth and Families Department, Juvenile Probation, and the Juvenile Services Center. Learn methods and strategies you can use for developing Parent Education Nights through collaboration with school and community partners. We’ll review portions of these educational sessions, and you’ll leave with new ideas about informing parents on teenage substance abuse trends and empowering them to get the help they need for their children.

Michele DeLese, School Resource Officer Coordinator, Farmington Police Department; Cathy McDonald, Nursing Coordinator, Farmington Municipal Schools ; Traci Neff, Juvenile Facility Administrator, San Juan County Juvenile Services Center

#16 Ethics in Mental Health Mentoring: FERPA and HIPAA – Alvarado G

Mental health problems affect about 20% of all children, and disrupt their ability to function well at school.  Good communication between students, their families and providers of education, health and mental health is critical to providing the best possible care for students with mental health issues. However, facilitating this may be at odds with their rights to privacy and autonomy. We’ll review the fundamental principles of ethical practice as they relate to negotiating federal and state laws governing educational (FERPA) and health (HIPAA) records, as well as the distinction between student and parental consent, assent and dissent. Case examples will be used to help create collaborative plans for advocating for the mental health needs of students .

Avron (Avi) Kriechman, MD, Child, Adolescent and Family Psychiatrist and Shawn Sidhu, Psychiatrist, University of New Mexico

12:15 pm – 1:30 pm Lunch

The menu selection for Wednesday, April 30th will be:

Regular Option:
Brie and Apple Stuffed Chicken with Farmers Market Salad, Rice and Vegetables

Vegetarian, Vegan and Gluten Free Option:
Roasted Stuffed Bell Pepper: Quinoa and Fresh Vegetables served with Polenta Cake and Braised Spinach

1:30 pm – 2:30 pm Breakout Sessions

#17 School Violence – Franciscan 

Violence taking place in the school setting has been an all too common occurrence in the media. It seems as though every few months there is a tragic event resulting in serious harm or even death to members of the student body. Less severe forms of violence such as cutting and/or bullying are highly common and take place very frequently across campuses nationwide. The purpose of this talk is to examine the role of mental health providers in the context of a violent school incident. We will discuss the breadth of potential responsibilities for mental health providers, effective communication and leadership skills in crisis, obstacles to providing such leadership, some helpful hints for parents, techniques to address children in a developmentally appropriate way, delivery of bad news, normal and pathological responses to trauma, and strategies to enhance community resiliency.

Avron (Avi) Kriechman, MD, Child, Adolescent and Family Psychiatrist and Shawn Sidhu, Psychiatrist, University of New Mexico

#18 E-Cigarettes, Hookah, Little Cigars, Oh My! How to Address Emerging Tobacco Products – Turquoise

Do your students know more about new tobacco products than you? What do you know about e-cigarettes, hookahs and little cigars? Electronic cigarette use by youth has risen dramatically in the past two years alone. School administrators, health professionals and teachers are confronted by an ever-changing array of tobacco products used by, and brought to school by students. Receive information about current data on the new and emerging tobacco products youth are using most often, and their effects on health, behavior and education. Improve your ability to talk with students about the risks of usage, and learn how to use tools from the NM Tobacco-Free Schools Toolkit.

Janine Corinne, Coordinator, NM Tobacco-Free Schools Project;  Shelley Mann-Lev, Director, NM Tobacco-Free Schools Project, Santa Fe Public Schools

#19 “Talk About It.” – High Impact, Low Cost Campaign Can Reduce Youth Suicide – Alvarado H

You’ve got enormous power, so it’s time to harness your collective influence! It’s pretty easy – and more fun than you might imagine. In this active and interactive workshop, sharpen your helping skills. Then put your creative minds to work developing a “Talk About It.” campaign that will increase help-seeking and reduce mental health stigma. Keeping it all inside and the perceived shame of asking for help are the deadly duo that contributes strongly to the high youth suicide rate in New Mexico. Leave with an action plan to implement a no/low-cost, high-impact campaign complete with the support and tools to make it fun and easily doable.

JoAnn Sartorius, Consultant, Trainer, Program Manager, Programs for Adolescents

#20 No Means NO:  Assessing our Response to Sexual Assault

Sexual assaults are not crimes of passion, they are crimes of violence and power. The aftermath can be as much of a crisis as the event itself; victims feel afraid, ashamed, confused and depressed. In New Mexico, 30% of the people who are sexually assaulted are between the ages of 13 and 18. We’ll identify the need for youth-focused sexual assault services in our communities, assess primary prevention and awareness tools and strategies, and evaluate sexual assault campus response options for your school. Participate in interactive activities, and receive educational resources for promoting healthy relationships and collaborating successfully with local agencies that can assist your school in developing a sexual assault response team.

Isaac Duran, MA, Youth Services Director and Luis Polo, No Means NO Program Facilitator, Center Against Family Violence

#21 Culture, Suicide and Youth At Risk

With suicide on the rise in New Mexico, we are finding that populations who have traditionally not been widely impacted by youth suicide are experiencing disproportionate increases in suicide rates. Despite vast amounts of data on suicide in general, not much information focuses on minority populations. We’ll explore the often overlooked cultural factors in working with youth experiencing suicidal thoughts or at risk of suicide.  Research on culture and the dynamics of suicide will be reviewed; our main focus is to help professionals incorporate cultural factors into their prevention and intervention efforts.

Ashley Swanson, LISW and Mike Tattershall, Social Worker, Roswell Independent School District

#22 Stepping Into Literacy

It’s not dancing, or marching, it’s stepping as a means to academic achievement and wellness. Stepping uses the body as an instrument to create intricate rhythms and sounds through a combination of footsteps, claps and spoken words, and it is a part of America’s artistic and cultural heritage. Not just idle play, stepping teaches teamwork and facilitates bonding. It has been shown to have legitimate neurological value, improving motor, cognitive and expressive skills. We’ll have fun in this instructive “jam session”, discovering how the simple acts of stepping and clapping result in surprising positive physical and psychological effects.

Amina Bilal and Cecilia Trujillo, Teachers, Taos Municipal Schools

#24 The Basics of Healthy-Weight Living

Losing weight is a national pastime. Americans spend more than two billion dollars every year on diet products, yet obesity has still taken on epidemic proportions.  We’ll separate diet fact from fiction, and help you design a healthy-weight plan to fit your life.  Implementing evidence-based strategies that form the foundation of weight management make it easier for you to protect your health, and hold on to your hard-earned dollars. You will also gain a greater appreciation for how your own weight-related attitudes and actions can affect school culture and the health of your students.

Brenda Wolfe, Clinical Director, Eating Disorders Institute of New Mexico

2:45 pm – 3:45 pm Breakout Sessions

#25 Plan, Prepare, Protect: Safe Schools and Your Role

School should be a safe place for students, teachers and staff. Tragically, this has not always been the case. The goal of New Mexico Public Schools is to build a culture of preparedness that will increase the ability of all schools to be proactive and responsive if situations arise.  We’ll focus on prevention and school emergency operation plans, including protection, mitigation, response and recovery. You’ll get an overview of the Wellness Policy (NMAC 6.12.6) and required, site-specific coordinated safety plans. We’ll review the components of a safe schools plan, and help you identify and partner with local, state and national agencies to establish, revise or implement your school’s safety strategies.

Dean Hopper, Director and Perdita Wexler, Health Education Coordinator, NM Public Education Department

#26 Emergency Medications in Schools 

Led by a panel of members of the New Mexico Council on Asthma’s Policy Committee, discuss the recently passed legislation that provides access to emergency albuterol and epinephrine in schools. Discover the status of implementing the law. Discuss steps that school nurses need to take for implementation in their schools.

Cindy Greenberg, RN, BSN, MSN, NCSN, State School Health Nurse Consultant and Winona Stoltzfus, MD, State School Health Officer, NM Department of Health

#27 YouthCHAT- Empowering Youth-Adult Partnerships for Better Health Care

Health professionals are often uncomfortable asking adolescents questions related to behavioral, mental or sexual health issues, yet building stronger connections between teens and health professionals is vital to improving the health of our young people. We’ll introduce you to YouthCHAT, a unique program where youth actor/teachers help health care providers learn effective communication skills for adolescent care and provide valuable feedback. Young people who go through this training also become more health literate, understand the importance of being honest with their providers, and know their rights and responsibilities.

Juliette Beck, Theatre Department Head/Thespian Troupe Director/Theatre Teacher, Public Academy for Performing Arts; Amilya Ellis, Behavioral Health Consultant, Department of Health, Office of School & Adolescent Health

#28 Social Media: The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly

APS communications and social media strategist Maralyn Beck will talk about:

  • What social media is
  • How students and others are using social media
  • The “ugly truth” of social media — including risks and cyberbullying
  • Good social media behavior
  • How to leverage social media to better engage with students and others.

Maralyn Beck, Social Media Strategist, Albuquerque Public Schools

#28 Life Skills for an Abundant Life Cancelled

Do you remember how and when you gained experiences that taught you how to cope with life’s lessons and set your own goals? Most of the youth we guide do not yet possess the skills they need for managing their adult lives. By understanding and teaching them the skills they are missing, they will be more likely to be engaged in their own growth, a have a more secure and solid future. We’ll spend some time reflecting on the importance  and processes of coping techniques and goal setting, and you will master different techniques and tools you put into use working with youth in any setting.

Michelle Linn-Gust, Author/ Speaker, Chellehead Works

#29 Afterschool Programs: A Treasure of Opportunities

Afterschool programs aren’t just warehousing kids who need supervision. They have evolved into dynamic extentions of the school day, encouraging learning and discovery.  Do you know that opportunities exist in quality afterschool programs that can help you meet your school’s health program goals? Afterschool staff share your concerns for the health of the students and families; learn how to connect and forge lasting links between the school day and afterschool that support well-being. You may discover some hidden gems!

Laurie Mueller, Chair, New Mexico Afterschool Alliance

#30 Risk and Resilience:  Students Speak Out

What’s the point of long student health surveys like the New Mexico Youth Risk and Resiliency Survey – who uses all that data, anyway? Join students from Rio Grande High School and the Native American Community Academy to find out! Learn how they were able to conduct their own analyses of their communities’ data, and what they are doing to act on their findings.  This highly interactive and engaging session will challenge your preconceptions about health-risking behaviors among youth and you’ll have an opportunity to explore the New Mexico YRRS data.

Jose Canaca and Courtney FitzGerald, Health Sciences Associate Scientist, University of New Mexico; Kirk Kanesta, Student, The Native American Community Academy Charter School; Debbie Medina, Crossroads Counselor, Albuquerque Public Schools; Marlene Munoz, Student, Rio Grande High School

#31 Health and Marketing: Media Literacy and Our Youth

Print ads, commercials, social media, TV and films bombard young people with targeted messages, obvious and hidden. We’ll explore media literacy concepts with a focus on food marketing and nutrition, deconstructing recent examples from social media, commercials, reality television and documentary film. Take a look behind the scenes in the world of junk food marketing, analyze messages on body image, and connect Internet access to community health. Participate in activities you can use with students, discover best practices for incorporating media literacy into any health subject or conversation, and find out how youth and adults “talk back” to mainstream media messages.

Jessica Collins, Program Director, Media Literacy Project

#32 Preventing Eating Disorders in Schools

Although Eating Disorders (EDs) affect only about 10% of the population, they are the most lethal of mental disorders.  The impairment they cause interferes with physical development, cognitive function, social maturation and essentially every aspect of development.  Creating a school culture that promotes body acceptance is key to helping children resist the forces that promote EDs.  Advance your understanding of school-based risk factors and scientifically based ED prevention strategies, and learn practical skills you can apply for promoting healthy body acceptance.  Through lecture, self-assessment and discussion you will enhance your ability to protect yourself, and the children you teach and serve, from the ravages of these disorders.

Monika Peterson, Director of Adolescent Programs and Brenda Wolfe, Clinical Director, Eating Disorders Institute of New Mexico


4:00 – 5:00 pm Keynote Presentation

This would be Funny…. if it wasn’t Happening to Me! How to Embrace Change with Humor, Enthusiasm and Vigor

This compelling motivational speech will increase your comfort and confidence in the face of stress and change. Explore how the only way out of stress is through it and that it can actually be fun to embrace life challenges.

Humor helps. The ability to laugh at life helps us deal with daily disappointments and setbacks. Humor gives school nurses, counselors and social workers the nerve to serve in our increasingly complex, changing and challenging environment. Join us as we demonstrate how humor helps you stay in control, stay positive, and maintain balance and perspective.

In this motivational speech you will:

Derive strength from change

Learn to transform bad into good

Focus on wellness and your health when stress levels are high Laugh when things go wrong Summon your strength, courage, and talent during the topsy-turvy times in your life

Jody Urquhart, Professional Speaker and Author of All Work & No SAY

 

Thursday, May 1, 2014

8:00 am – 9:30 am Keynote Presentation

A Stranger in Someone Else’s House

When young people in our schools and communities are given a voice and chance to engage in the decision-making process and are empowered to speak out and act on issues that impact their lives, they are capable of achieving great accomplishments. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth, youth of color, and youth with disabilities are systematically marginalized and oppressed in our schools and other institutions. They are disproportionately affected by disciplinary policies and practices that were often put into place in an effort to protect them or decrease the chance that they would experience bullying or harassment. Many end up in alternative schools, expelled, or even in the juvenile justice system – all part of the “school to prison pipeline.” Because of this systemic oppression, these young people often experience poor health and academic outcomes and report higher levels of violence against them, increased incidences of depression, and lower feelings of well-being than their peers. Explore strategies that school staff and community members can take to engage youth and empower them to take control of their lives. Review evidence on how the presence of GSA-clubs, implementing LGBTQ-inclusive lessons, and other ways you can support students in your school, make the environment safer for all students, and ensure that students feel like their schools and communities are welcoming and supportive.

Christopher White, PhD, Director of the Safe and Supportive Environments Project at Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) Network

10:00 am – 11:00 am Breakout Sessions

#33 Immunizations: Protecting New Mexico Children

There are frequent changes in vaccine recommendations — Dr. Chilton follows these closely and using his usual multimedia techniques, plans to bring you the latest on what’s happening in America’s number one public health intervention, immunizations. Our goal is prevention of disease; we want to stop missing opportunities to avoid diseases that plagued humanity until the middle of the last century and are just now coming under control.

Lance Chilton, Professor and Pediatrician, University of New Mexico Department of Pediatrics

#34 What Language Does Your Student/ Patient Hurt In? A Perspective On The Health of NM’s Indigenous Youth

Anthony and Shannon Fleg, Coordinators, Native Health Initiative

#35 QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention

Do you know the warning signs for suicide? Your knowledge about and response to clues can prevent a tragedy. In this session you’ll learn to prevent suicide and suicide attempts, offer hope and save a life. We’ll train you in the three-step QPR (Question, Persuade, and Refer) method for suicide prevention. QPR is designed to help you identify suicidal persons and refer them to professionals who can assess, manage and treat the underlying illnesses that promote suicidal behavior. All attendees receive a QPR Gatekeeper certificate.

Laura Harrison, Executive Director, New Mexico Suicide Prevention Coalition; Sabrina Strong, Executive Director, Waking Up Alive

#36 Effectively Engaging Young Fathers

First-time fathers, no matter how old, are rarely prepared for the realities of fatherhood.  Teen fathers especially need support to inspire them to confidently claim their role. From pregnancy to birth, and then safely comforting and caring for their child, they have much to learn. Children of involved fathers or strong male role models are more likely to do well in school, have high self-esteem, exhibit empathy and pro-social behavior, and eventually become responsible parents. They are less likely to fall prey to high-risk behaviors such as drug use, truancy and criminal activity.  Benefits to the community include reduced Medicaid costs, decreased enforcement and incarceration costs, increased employment, and decreased need to rely on government services. Find out how we have been able engage young fathers to be better fathers, supporting nurturing and nonviolent families.

Dominic Martinez, Facilitator, Nonviolenceworks, Inc.

#37 Conquering the Challenges to Change

Change is hard, and not all change is an improvement! Even the most desired changes can be difficult to accomplish. The Model for Improvement is a systematic approach to achieving positive, sustainable changes. It has been used by healthcare providers and support staff to improve the care they deliver in their practices. In this interactive session we’ll help you identify areas for improvement and provide tools and resources that you can use to drive positive change in any setting.

Courtney McKinney, Quality Improvement Specialist and John Martinez, Program Manager, Envision New Mexico

#38 Child Sexual Abuse: What It Is and What You Do About It

Renee Ornelas, Medical Director, Para Los Ninos/ UNM Pediatrics

#39 Minimizing School Infection Risks for Children with Disabilities

Many children with disabilities are at high risk for sustaining an infection.  School settings expose everyone to a wide range of pathogens, so how can we provide a safer environment for theses kids? We’ll explore the kinds of risks that are out there for children with a wide range of disabilities, including those with tracheotomy tubes, and consider some methods to aid us in keeping this population healthy.

Jo Anne Wright, Clinical Nurse Specialist, Peds Pulm/Peds ENT, Children’s Hospital of NM/UHHSC

#40 Creating Effective Youth-Adult Partnerships

When young people are empowered and given the opportunity to act on issues that impact their lives, they are able to advocate for themselves and engage in the decision-making process in their schools and communities. Overall, these youth report feeling safer and more supported and tend to have better health and academic outcomes. Obtain strategies for creating partnerships with youth and discuss ways that adults can support and engage youth in schools. Brainstorm solutions with fellow participants around challenges that they may or have faced in their work with youth. Explore the concept of “adultism” and how it is used as an explicit and implicit mechanism for oppressing and discriminating against young people and preventing them to realize their full potential. Explore strategies for tearing down adultist practices and empowering youth.

Christopher White, PhD, Director of the Safe and Supportive Environments Project at Gay-Straight Alliance (GSA) Network

11:15 am – 12:15 pm Breakout Sessions

#41 Finding the Translator: Engaging Mental Health Agencies

Communication between people is often challenging, especially if they do not understand each other’s context and terminology. Communication between agencies and organizations is exponentially more complex, because they also deal with internal, bureaucratic and non-standardized terms, policies and perspectives. This impacts their ability to collaborate and provide meaningful assistance to the populations they serve. We’ll present a Mental Health Guidance Document from the Office of School and Adolescent Health, focused on how School and Community Mental Health Agencies interact, and how they can start to speak the same “language.” There wil be a panel discussion, and interviews, consults and statistics will be presented.

Anna Curtis, School Mental Health Advocate, SE Region, Yolanda Cordova, Director, Amilya Ellis, Behavioral Health Consultant and Bridgette Ruiz, MSW Intern, Department of Health, Office of School and Adolescent Health

#42 Aiding the Student with Asthma

(limited to 20 participants)

School nurses know all too well how distressing an asthma attack can be for a student. The management of asthma can be complicated by a student’s lack of knowledge, and by the variety of devices available for patients. According to a recent study, only one in 169 caregivers of a child with asthma knew all the steps for correct asthma inhaler technique, which is associated with poor asthma control and an increased frequency of emergency department visits. We’ll describe various asthma devices, including metered-dose inhalers, diskus inhalers, peak flow meters and nebulizers, and provide hands-on practice to learn how to teach students with asthma and their caregivers how to correctly use them.

RuthAnn Goradia, Chronic Health Needs Resource Nurse, Albuquerque Public Schools; Kathy Moseley, Program Manager, American Lung Association in New Mexico

#43 QPR Gatekeeper Training for Suicide Prevention

Do you know the warning signs for suicide? Your knowledge about and response to clues can prevent a tragedy. In this session you’ll learn to prevent suicide and suicide attempts, offer hope and save a life. We’ll train you in the three-step QPR (Question, Persuade, and Refer) method for suicide prevention. QPR is designed to help you identify suicidal persons and refer them to professionals who can assess, manage and treat the underlying illnesses that promote suicidal behavior. All attendees receive a QPR Gatekeeper certificate.

Laura Harrison, Executive Director, New Mexico Suicide Prevention Coalition; Sabrina Strong, Executive Director, Waking Up Alive

#44 Sex, Love and Rock a BABY!  Dreams to Reality for Teen Parents

There are eight major reasons why teen parents drop out of school – and just as many reasons why they need advocates, and assistance from community partners. Expectant and parenting teens are less likely to graduate from high school, attend college and get well-paying jobs.  Teen parents and their children are at increased risk for poverty, impacting the future of the family and placing an economic burden on the state and nation. We’ll examine the challenges these teens face in their efforts to succeed as students, mothers and fathers – including absentee policies, negative attitudes and low expectations, navigating the system, juggling school and parenthood, and childcare issues. Join the dialogue, and develop helpful strategies for supporting expectant and parenting teens in your school and community.

Sally Kosnick, Co- Director, NM GRADS

#45 So, What Do I Call You? Achieving Transgender Cultural Competency

This is an introduction to transgender people, their lives and issues, and recommended etiquette. Professionals working in the school health field may meet a transgender young person, co-worker or parent; we come from all walks of life. We’ll go over basic aspects of the differences between assigned sex, gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation. Our objective is to open a dialogue, humanize transgender folks and increase visibility and awareness – while decreasing the discrimination, fear, hostility and violence that is routinely directed toward members of this population.

Adrien Lawyer, Executive Director, Transgender Resource Center of New Mexico

#46 Partnering With Parents for Positive Student Outcomes

When parents face a challenging situation involving their child and a school or community service, they often perceive professionals as adversaries.  Past experiences, prejudices, news stories or gossip may color their view of how the system works and whether their child will get fair treatment.  Is your attitude toward parents affected by these same things?  As professionals, we must build trust in the process and services that we provide to  students.  It is also vital to build good will in the community, so future needs on both sides can be discussed in a manner that leads to mutual understanding. We’ll interact in this session to gain empathy for parental concerns and points of view and seek the highest outcome: parents and professionals working together to find meaningful solutions in the best interests of the students.

Lydia Herrera, Owner, LydiaHerrera.com

#47 Stepping Into Literacy

It’s not dancing, or marching, it’s stepping as a means to academic achievement and wellness. Stepping uses the body as an instrument to create intricate rhythms and sounds through a combination of footsteps, claps and spoken words, and it is a part of America’s artistic and cultural heritage. Not just idle play, stepping teaches teamwork and facilitates bonding. It has been shown to have legitimate neurological value, improving motor, cognitive and expressive skills. We’ll have fun in this instructive “jam session”, discovering how the simple acts of stepping and clapping result in surprising positive physical and psychological effects.

Amina Bilal and Cecilia Trujillo, Teachers, Taos Municipal Schools

#48 Why Can’t EYE Read?

Vision training (eye exercises) and tinted glasses are currently popular for treating New Mexico students with reading difficulties. But has anyone ever looked at the evidence regarding these treatment methods? The American Academy of Pediatrics researches this topic extensively and has issued concise recommendations for the many children who struggle to read. To understand this complex topic, we will explore the anatomy and physiology of the visual system and how it pertains to reading. Causes of reading disorders will  be explained, with an emphasis on dyslexia. Myths regarding treatment will be dispelled and evidence-based therapies will assist you to educate families with reading-disabled children and refer them to an appropriate expert.

Todd Goldblum, MD, Pediatric Ophthalmologist, Family & Children’s Eye Care of NM

12:15 pm – 1:30 pm Lunch

The menu selected for Thursday, May 1st will be:

Regular Option:
Red Chile Pork Tamales, Rolled Green Chile Cheese Enchiladas and Southwest Caesar Salad

Vegetarian, Vegan and Gluten Free Options:
Black Bean and Calabacita Tamale, Blue Corn Tortilla filled with Roasted Root Vegetables and Calabacita

Note: If you would prefer to not eat the pork tamales, simply let the registration staff know and we will provide you with a vegetarian meal ticket to have the alternative option.

1:30 pm – 2:45 pm Breakout Sessions

#49 Coordinating Individual Health Plans for Students with Developmental Disabilities

Yolanda Cordova, Director, NMDOH, Office of School & Adolescent Health

#50 Super Allies: Supporting LGBTQ Students

LGBTQ are at significantly elevated and disproportionate risk to attempt suicide, abuse drugs and alcohol, and suffer from depression. Did you know they are four times more likely to consider attempting suicide than heterosexual youth? They are also frequent targets of bullying and harassment.  Explore some of the risk factors and challenges LGBTQ youth disproportionately face and equip yourself with tools to become a super ally for LGBTQ students.

Jenn Jevertson, Program Manager and LuzMarina Serrano, NMGSAN Program Coordinator, Santa Fe Mountain Center

#51 Preventing Suicide in Native American Families

In the past several years, New Mexico has experienced a disturbing increase in suicides within Native American communities. The children of Native American families attend public schools throughout the state, and this rising incidence of suicide impacts school personnel and students. We’ll explore the history and attributes of Native families, and the effects of historical trauma on Native peoples in New Mexico.  Learn how to approach suicide awareness with Native American families, and how we can be most supportive and helpful to a family after the suicide of a Native young person.

Susan Casias, MSW, Trainer, New Mexico Suicide Prevention Coaltion

#52 Kids Having Kids: Strategies for Helping Expectant and Parenting Teens

Expectant and parenting teens need a strong network of support to deal with the challenges they face. School nurses, counselors and social workers are in an ideal position to link these teens to resources that facilitate their academic, parenting and life success.  We’ll provide information about resources and services, a framework for school/ community coordination, and specific strategies schools can use to promote health, well-being and educational achievement for teen parents. Presenters from Hobbs Municipal Schools will explain how they collaborate to provide encouragement and offer key services that help pregnant and parenting teens stay in school.

Jessica Aufrichtig, Teen Parent Suppport Coordinator, New Mexico Public Education Department; Paula Methola, GRADS Case Manager and Child Care Director, Boys and Girls Club of Hobbs, NM; Claudia Saxe, Social Worker, Hobbs Municipal Schools; Stefanie Shoults, Behavioral Health Nurse, Hobbs High School

#53 Changing the Conversation about Mental Illness [Repeated]

Are you aware that more than half of all mental health disorders begin by age 14? Unfortunately, research confirms that most people do not seek or receive treatment for years after problems show up. Engaging youth and families in conversations about mental illness can be difficult, even though early diagnosis, treatment and support are critical. We use Breaking the Silence lessons to help you open the dialogue, and bust common societal myths and stereotypes regarding mental illness. Challenge your own misconceptions, as you hear first person stories from youth, families whose children have a mental illness, or parents who struggle with their own. We’ll provide you with a packet of mental illness awareness lessons to use at your school site, a resource list, and a compassionate lens for viewing those who presently have or may be diagnosed with a mental illness.

Caroline Bonham, Director of the Center for Rural and Community Health and Vice Chair for Community Engagement in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of New mexico; Michele Herling, Executive Director, Compasionate Touch Network; Desiree Woodland, Teacher, National Alliance on Mental Illness

#54 The Generation Rx Initiative: Preventing Prescription Drug Misuse and Abuse

Megan Thompson, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Director of Experiential Education, UNM College of Pharmacy; David Garcia, Rachel Lacey, Hillary Sheckler and Christopher Drew Thornhill, Pharm.D. Candidate 2015, University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy

#55 Playing Their Way to Health: New Media and Youth Health Literacy

If a picture tells a thousand words, imagine the lessons a video game could share! Learn from young people about the ways they communicate with each other and connect with resources they need to be healthy.  Youth today don’t have all the tools they need to make informed decisions about their bodies and lives, so come explore new ways to meaningfully engage them. Play a youth-designed online video game addressing health literacy in a fun, creative, New Mexican way, then take the game and mini-curricula home to share with youth in your community.

Denicia Cadena, Communication and Cultural Strategy Director and Alicia Chavez, Youth and Community Organizer, Young Women United

#56 The Empathy Revolution

School and public shootings, bullying and violence; these events are on the rise, and more are being committed by young people. Schools and communities face an epidemic of declining empathy – our innate ability to identify with the feelings, thoughts and attitudes of another person. A pervasive lack of empathy results in aggression and lack of respect, contributing to decreased student health and lower academic success. Learn how empathy develops within the context of attachment and brain development, how crucial it is for positive human connection, and how to bring empathy into your classroom and community. As providers in educational settings, you have a uniquely powerful opportunity to teach empathy to the next generation. These specific strategies can improve the lives of your students, and our society.

Craig Pierce, CEO and Founder, Southwest Family Guidance Center

3:00 pm – 4:15 pm Breakout Sessions

#57 Filling the Nurse’s toolbox in constructing a well-built IEP

Susan Acosta, School Health Nurse Consultant, HSD/MAD – School Health Office

#58 Understanding and Preventing Bullying

According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, nearly every child will experience being bullied at some time. This is a serious issue for kids of all ages and from every type of communities. It creates a climate of fear and disrespect, emotional and physical consequences, and poor school performance. Children and teens who bully their peers are more likely to exhibit other anti-social and dangerous behaviors. We will discuss bullying, prevention and intervention techniques, and present key concepts of Adventures in a Caring Community, Santa Fe Mountain Center’s unique and successful prevention program, now in its eighth year. Come learn 10 Steps to Address Bullying and how to use fun and easy experiential activities to prevent bullying and build a caring community.

Jenn Jevertson, Program Manager, Santa Fe Mountain Center

#59 Not Another Life to Lose! 

Suicide is the third leading cause of death for youth ages 15-24, taking life without regard to age, income, education, race or gender. Strong evidence shows that a comprehensive public health approach can reduce and even eliminate suicide.  Learn how The National Action Alliance for Suicide Prevention has influenced nationwide public health dialogues and efforts through it’s Zero Suicide initiative, bringing suicide care to the core of behavioral health and primary care systems, and helping clinicians to save lives. Through the presentation of powerful real-life stories and compelling outcomes data, you will leave knowing why and how to bring these lessons to your campus and students.

David Covington, CEO & President, Crisis Access, LLC

#60 “You May be Excused”: Implementing New Policies for Expectant and Parenting Students

Education is a foundation for healthy families, and pregnant and parenting teens need flexibility to achieve their academic goals. They may miss class for pre and post-natal health care, or to be with a sick child; excusing these absences allows them to make up work and fulfill their educational requirements. A new law was recently enacted in New Mexico to address these needs. This interactive and experiential session, guided by young parents, will explore circumstances students and staff may face while navigating these new excused absence policies. We’ll provide knowledge about the law and policy standards, and tools for implementing changes, so we can make this policy work well for New Mexico schools and parenting students.

Micaela Cadena, Policy Director, Young Women United; Sally Kosnick, Co- Director, New Mexico GRADS; Stephanie Jackson, Associate Scientist, Public Health Program

#61 Changing the Conversation about Mental Illness [Repeated]

Are you aware that more than half of all mental health disorders begin by age 14? Unfortunately, research confirms that most people do not seek or receive treatment for years after problems show up. Engaging youth and families in conversations about mental illness can be difficult, even though early diagnosis, treatment and support are critical. We use Breaking the Silence lessons to help you open the dialogue, and bust common societal myths and stereotypes regarding mental illness. Challenge your own misconceptions, as you hear first person stories from youth, families whose children have a mental illness, or parents who struggle with their own. We’ll provide you with a packet of mental illness awareness lessons to use at your school site, a resource list, and a compassionate lens for viewing those who presently have or may be diagnosed with a mental illness.

Michele Herling, Executive Director, Compasionate Touch Network; Desiree Woodland, Teacher, National Alliance on Mental Illness

#62 The Generation Rx Initiative: Preventing Prescription Drug Misuse and Abuse

Megan Thompson, Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice, Director of Experiential Education, UNM College of Pharmacy; David Garcia, Rachel Lacey, Hillary Sheckler and Christopher Drew Thornhill, Pharm.D. Candidate 2015, University of New Mexico, College of Pharmacy

#63 Tools to Engage Youth

When working with youth and families, nothing really happens if we don’t get meaningfully engaged with them.  Engagement is one of the most important and most difficult aspects of any healing relationship.  This workshop will address engagement as an intentional process with tools and wisdom drawn from the Wraparound approach.  We will explore the power of strengths, the barrier of shame, and the need to get youth/families self-invested in their own future. We will discuss the process of identifying underlying needs, re-framing problem behaviors, and understanding the concept of family burden as a critical driver of motivation.

Steve Johnson, Executive Director, New Day Youth and Family Services

#64 Do Your Protocols Measure Up?

A small measurement error can make a big difference, changing the calculation of a child’s Body Mass Index (BMI) from healthy to overweight. The NM DOH uses a standardized measurement protocol to precisely measure a student’s height and weight, resulting in valid, accurate BMI results. Whether you are a new or experienced elementary school nurse or health instructor, you will benefit from practicing these skills for achieving the most accurate measurements. We’ll also review a computerized BMI analysis tool from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and methods for evaluating BMI data.

Rita Condon, Healthy Kids New Mexico Program Manager, New Mexico Department of Health